Green, Orange, or Red?

Use the traffic lights framework to identify these scenarios

  1. Harry, aged 8, masturbates for most of the day at school. When masturbating he will often expose his penis to the rest of the class.
  2. Teekai, aged 13, spends a lot of time alone in his bedroom with the door shut. When his mum knocks on the door he tells her to go away. Lately he is putting his sheets and pyjamas into the washing basket to be washed every morning.
  3. Gayle, aged 12, often tries to sit on the lap of her mum’s male friends. When she does, she will talk about their bodies and say that it is OK for them to kiss her. Sometimes she likes to dance for them and says she is being a pop star.
  4. Alex, aged 15, spends lots of time chatting to friends on the internet. Recently, Alex made a new friend, ‘Sexy Boy’, online. The more they chat, the more Alex feels attracted to ‘Sexy Boy’ and thinks about making a time to meet him in person. Alex talks to a friend about it.
  5. Marley and Ashmita, both aged 4, are playing in the cubby house and have both taken their underpants off. They are looking at and touching each other’s genitals.
  6. Harper, aged 7, tells her teacher that she has seen Lucas, aged 13, touching her best friend Cindi’s vagina.
  7. Tilly, aged 16, is overheard telling her close friends about having intercourse and oral sex with her boyfriend.  He is a 17 year old at the same school. She tells them that she enjoys it.

 

Identify the behaviour
Understand the behaviour
Respond to address the child's needs

 

Where to get help

Talking about concerns helps prevent harm or abuse.

Parentline: 1300 30 1300 www.parentline.com.au
Lifeline: 13 11 14 www.lifeline.org.au
Relationships Australia: 1300 364 277 www.relationships.org.au
1800Respect Online: 1800 737 732 www.1800respect.org.au
Child Safety Services (Qld): 1800 177 135 www.communities.qld.gov.au/childsafety/protecting-children

Contact Child Protection or Police Services in your state or territory if a child or adult requires protection from harm.

 

References

Atkinson, C., & Newton, D. (2010). Online behaviours of adolescents: Victims, perpetrators and Web 2.0.
Journal of Sexual Aggression, 16(1), 107-120.
Boyd, C., & Bromfield, L. (2006). Young people who sexually abuse: Key issues. Australian Institute of
Family Studies: National Child Protection Clearinghouse. Retrieved from http://www.aifs.gov.au/
nch/pubs/brief/pb1/pb1.html.
Chaffin, M., Berliner, L., Block, R., Johnson, T. C., Friedrich, W. N., Louis, D. G., et al. (2008). Report of the
ATSA Task Force on Children With Sexual Behavior Problems. Child Maltreatment, 13(2), 199-218.
Child at Risk Assessment Unit. (2000). Age appropriate sexual play and behaviour in children. Canberra:
ACT Department of Community Health.
Evertsz, J., & Miller, R. (2011). Children with problem sexual behaviour and their families: Best interests
case practice model, specialist practice resource. Melbourne: Victorian Government Department of
Human Services and Australian Institute of Family Studies.
Finkelhor, D. (2009). The prevention of childhood sexual abuse. Future Child, 19(2), 169-194.
Freidrich, W. N., Fisher, J., Broughton, D., Houston, M. & Shafran, C. R. (1998). Normative sexual behavior
in children: a contemporary sample. Pediatrics, 101(4), E9.
Johnson, T. C. (2007). Understanding children's sexual behaviors: What's natural and healthy. San Diego:
Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma.
Johnson, T. C. (2009). Helping children with sexual behavior problems: A guidebook for professionals
and caregivers (4th ed.). San Diego: Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma.Lamont, A. (2010). Effects of child abuse and neglect for children and adolescents. Melbourne:
Australian Institute of Family Studies: National Child Protection Clearinghouse. Retrieved from
http://www.aifs.gov.au/nch/pubs/sheets/rs17/rs17.html.
Larsson, I. (2000). Sexual abuse of children: Child sexuality and sexual behaviour. Sweden:
Socialstyrelsen.
Pratt, R., & Miller, R. (2010). Adolescents with sexually abusive behaviours and their families: Best
interests case practice model, specialist practice resource. Melbourne: Victorian Government
Department of Human Services and Australian Institute of Family Studies.
Ryan, G. (2009). Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Prevention of Abusive Behaviors in Childhood and
Adolescence. Colorado: Kempe Perpetration Prevention Program and University of Colorado School
of Medicine.
Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. (2002). Guidelines for Comprehensive
Sexuality Education: Kindergarten through 12th grade. (3rd ed.) New York: SEICUS.
Smith, A., Agius, P., Mitchell, A., Barrett, C., & Pitts, M. (2009). Secondary Students and Sexual Health,
2008. Melbourne: La Trobe University, Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health & Society.
Tucci, J., Mitchell, J., & Goddard, C. (2010). Doing nothing hurts children: Community attitudes about
child abuse and child protection in Australia. Australian Childhood Foundation. Retrieved from
http://www.childhood.org.au/Assets/Files/6c7fbbbb-0c34-4c0f-8808-cccb2db...
 

 

This content originally published by Family Planning Queensland. © 2012 Family Planning Queensland. Reprinted with permission.